The 30 Major Immigrant Groups in Norway (2017)


This blogpost will somehow give an overview of the number of immigrants in Norway as of the latest official statistics in the government. A short description follows providing a good perspective of that certain country. There are only 137 countries on the list. Those countries with migrant population comprising less than 0,05% of the total population in Norway are not included in the complete list.

INTRODUCTION

There are some terms that this blogpost utilizes to elaborate on three major types of migrants:
  • Category 1. Those with familial relationships in Norway. They are those who were born either by one or both Norwegian parents, regardless of where they are actually born. These group are theoretically the easiest to integrate into the Norwegian society because the connection they have is more personal and comprehensive. The countries with the greatest percentage of their migrants in Norway in this category could have a good relationship with Norway given it might there are less visa restrictions for their citizens to come and stay.

  • Category 2. Those who are second-generation migrants. They are born in Norway from both migrant parents. These group is actually very crucial for Norway's future. These individuals are raised in Norway, so they have acquired probably both citizenship and the values the country stand for. A high percentage of migrant on this category means there is also significant fertility rate among migrants belonging to a certain country. This would mean more social support and services are used than what was actually gained from their taxpaying migrant parents. Moreover, a high percentage on this category would reflect a challenge with integration as the process would be entirely dependent on how willing both their migrant parents adapt to the Norwegian culture and society. Personally speaking, high percentage means at least 25% of the whole migrant population from a certain country.

  • Category 3. Those who are first-generation migrants. They come either for work, asylum and other legal reasons to reside in Norway. This group is the most challenging in terms of integration. It would take time before one could eventually learn the language, understand culture and adopt the values the country stands for. The process is more difficult if the migrant came for reasons of seeking for refuge from persecution or war / conflict were they come from. Interestingly, those who attain work permits in Norway become direct competitor of those Norwegians who are currently unemployed. On the other hand, those who come to Norway to seek for asylum would naturally get social benefits that would require utilization of taxes paid by the working segment of the society.
QUESTIONS

These blogpost would like its readers to reflect on the following questions:
  • If there is a significant percentage of migrant population (over 15% for example) belonging to Category 2 (second-generation migrants), would a sufficient number of migrants from Category 3 (first-generation migrants) coming from the same country be adequate to support them economically, or would the Norwegian welfare state be more strained because of this? 

  • If there is a significant percentage of migrant population ( over 50% for example) belonging to Category 3 from a certain country, would that mean that it would be harder for them to integrate themselves and perhaps stick into their cultural identity rather than assimilate into Norwegian society?
The complete list of all countries are found at the end of this blogpost. A personal opinion is also stated after enumerating the top thirty countries.

TOP 30

1. Sweden 

122,411 Swedes have crossed the border to live and stay in its neighboring country Norway. A significant number of Swedes married or have familial connections in the country. Approximately three out of ten Swedes are considered immigrants for a variety of reasons.

2. Poland 

Very High Percent of Polish citizens work in Norway. However, only about nine percent of those Polish staying in Norway are born in the country from Polish parents. The number of individuals with Polish background are almost the same with those from Sweden. Polish population started to swell after it has been admitted to the European Union in the nineties.

3. Denmark 

Over 88,000 individuals with connection to another Nordic country are living in Norway. Just like Swedes, many have familial relationships in the country. 

4. United States 

Surprisingly, many Americans (62,000) have opted to stay in Norway. Many of them have families, and about one out seven persons with American association is considered a regular immigrant. 

5. Germany 

Due to its relative proximity, Norway has become an alternative residence of many Germans. Over half of the Germans have either married or part of a Norwegian family. Approximately, four out five Germans living in Norway have migrated for work, study and etc.

6. United Kingdom

There is a good relationship between the Norwegian and the British people. As a result, over 56,000 British individuals call Norway their home.'

7. Pakistan 

Due to migration wave in the seventies, many individuals from Pakistan migrated into the counrty. Interestingly, there are many from Pakistan about 45% are considered immigrants without any familial association with anyone in the country. Almost one-third of them are second-generation immigrants born in Norway.

8. Lithuania 

Comparing with another land, Lithuania is quite similar to its neighbor Poland in terms of demography and reasons of coming to Norway. However, the number is just one-third in size compared to its larger neighbor.

9. Somalia 

About 42,000 Somalians are living in Norway. Almost 30% are second-generation immigrants from the war-torn state.

10. Philippines 

Almost 35,000 Filipinos call Norway their second home. They comprise the largest migrant group in the Southeast Asian region. About 59% of Filipinos in Norway either work or study as first generation immigrants. Only seven percent are second-generation immigrants. This statistics confirms that Filipinos now is the largest migrant group in Norway, not coming from a conflict-torn developing country.

11. Iraq 

Many individuals from the war-torn country have transferred to Norway. A very significant percentage of them are second-generation immigration, being born in Norway from both immigrant parents.

12. Thailand 

Over 29,000 Thais are living in Norway. They used to be the largest Southeast Asian group of migrants until Filipinos took over in the recent years.

13. Vietnam 

In the advent of the Vietnam War, many refugees sought refuge in the country. Today, 25694 Vietnamese are residents in Norway. Half of them are regular immigrants either for work, study and other reasons.

14. Russia 

The big neighbor in the east and in the Artic region has some its citizens living in Norway. There are about 25,000 of them. One of eight of these Russians are second-generation migrants.

15. Iran 

Almost 24000 Persians are residents in Norway. Seven out of ten are considered immigrants for asylum, work and study reasosn. One out six of them are second-generation immigrants from the conservation Muslim nation.

16. Eritrea 

Not far behind Iran is Eriteria, another country plagued with political turmoils and conflicts with its neighboring country Ethiopia. Over 80% of the Eriterians living in Norway are considered immigrants, mostly who got asylum.

17. Turkey 

22673 individuals with connection to Turkey are living in Norway. There is a significant number of them who are born in Norway from migrant parents.

18. Syria 

In the advent of the refugee crisis and Syrian Civil War last year, many Syrians sought asylum in Norway. Nine out of ten Syrians living in Norway are first-generation immigrants. There are 22668 Syrians in Norway as of the recent statistics.

19. Finland 

There are 19825 Finns living in Norway. Just like other Nordic countries, there are a significant portion of the migrant population with familial ties in Norway. That comprises 64,7% of the total.

20. India 

Over half of the 19818 Indians living in the country are first-generation immigrants. Two out of ten of them are second-generation immmigrants. 

21. Afghanistan 

Another conflict-torn country is part of the major migrant group in Norway. There are 19800 Afghanis living in Norway. Eight out ten are first generation immigrants.

22. Bosnia-Herzegovina 

This conflict-characterized country has the largest migrant group in Norway coming from the Balkan peninsula. Almost nine out ten of them are first- and second- generation migrants.

23. Netherlands 

The Dutch are about 18903 individuals in Norway. Over half of them have familial connection with someone in Norway.

24. Romania 

Similar with Bosnia, Romania another Balkan country has a significant migrant population in Norway. Interestingly, like Bosnia, nine out ten of them are first- and second- generation migrants.

25. Sri Lanka 

16893 Sri Lankans are residents in Norway. 9,4% of this population have familial relationships, while 36,7% are second-generation migrants, and the majority are first-generation migrants. 

26. Kosovo 

After Serbia is Kosovo, another conflict-stricken area. Many from Kosovo have transferred to Norway. There are 16752  residents, with the majority as first-generation migrants.

27. China 

A very little percentage of the entire Chinese population in the world call Norway their residence. Half of them are first-generation immigrants.

28. Iceland 

The last country among the Nordic nations in the list is Iceland. About 14000 Icelandics have transferred to Norway. Over one-third of them have familial relationships with someone in Norway, while approximately half are first-generation immigrants.

29. South Korea 

South Koreans top the list of the countries with the highest percentage of migrants with familial relationships in Norway, comprising over 91%. There are over 13000 of them in Norway. 

30. Chile 

Chile has the largest migrant community among all countries in South America, and those countries speaking Spanish as a main language. Four out ten of them have familial relationships with someone in Norway, while almost  half have come as first -generation migrants.

OPINION

Personally speaking, I believe statistics only would give us a glimpse of what could be happening in a country. When one speak of immigration, one should necessarily associate it with integration and assimilation without unnecessarily putting too much strain to the Norwegian welfare state for the common good. I am more concerned with the percentage of migrant population per country belonging to Category 2. They are indirectly-related to how much social benefits a particular migrant group has received from the national coffers. This should be seen in contrast to how many of those in Category 3 are earning sufficiently to cover all stately expenses to help raise or rear a child in Norway.

I do not suggest trying to discourage a certain migrant group in Norway, but everyone should be conscious enough that maintaining the Norwegian welfare state is a collective effort. Since a human being is a social person, we attempt to identify ourselves as part of a smaller group before a larger society. It would be easier to pinpoint some obeservations in a particular migrant group than see a complicated problem affecting the whole society. It is perhaps natural if a certain group has obtained more than the others, or at least more than they could actually earn and pay for; they should be at minimum working more to cover the deficit, rather allowing oneself to be in situation where getting another type of social benefit is crucial.

For those Norwegians, if you truly think that Norwegians should take control over your own country, so it is appropriate for you study who would actually take that control from you. I honestly think that would not come from migrants coming from Category 3 in this list. That is a long shot after all the hurdles the government to both protect Norwegians from unnecessarily competing with migrants for work. That will not come from Category 1 migrants as well. There exists more commonalities than differences in culture when one has a familial relationship with someone in the country. However, those who would change the political landscape of the country are likely those from Category 2. Those with greatest percentage of migrant population belonging there would have the greater chance of producing a good representative, strong and stern enough to protect the interest of the migrant group he or she is coming from, the values that group stands for, and at least their culture, religion and tradition. Make a list of those countries and imagine a picture of Norway, in its purest cultural form with a little influence of each of the country on that list.

As a migrant myself, I do not like how some narrow-minded Norwegians attempt to generalize the entire migrant population as very negative. That is quite unfair for those who have already struggled enough just to survive all the hindrances the government sets and the challenges one has to accept as part of starting anew in a foreign land. One could not just use the free will argument such that it our choice to stay so it is also up to tolerate all the hardships related to our decisions. The world today is getting smaller. The free will argument would eventually be obsolete as global need would be satisfied by collective effort, rather than doing something individually. This is to say national borders in the future will become just theoretical, but in reality, we shall work hand-on-hand respecting anyone's decision to live anywhere, and helping each other to make it happen, rather than making it difficult for them.

  COMPLETE LIST


Country
Total
Category 1
Category 2
Category 3
1
Sweden
122411
67,90 %
2,41 %
29,70 %
2
Poland
116680
7,20 %
9,48 %
83,30 %
3
Denmark
88585
75,80 %
2,20 %
22,00 %
4
United States
62437
85,40 %
1,08 %
13,50 %
5
Germany
58783
53,10 %
5,09 %
41,90 %
6
United Kingdom
56468
72,90 %
1,75 %
25,40 %
7
Pakistan
43941
16,50 %
38,07 %
45,50 %
8
Lithuania
43705
2,80 %
11,10 %
86,10 %
9
Somalia
42217
1,80 %
30,24 %
68,00 %
10
Philippines
35029
34,70 %
6,72 %
58,60 %
11
Iraq
33652
4,00 %
29,15 %
66,80 %
12
Thailand
29188
33,10 %
3,05 %
63,80 %
13
Vietnam
25694
11,80 %
34,67 %
53,50 %
14
Russia
25158
18,70 %
12,80 %
68,50 %
15
Iran
24393
12,40 %
17,20 %
70,40 %
16
Eritrea
24319
2,90 %
15,05 %
82,10 %
17
Turkey
22673
19,90 %
30,18 %
50,00 %
18
Syria
22668
1,70 %
6,45 %
91,90 %
19
Finland
19825
64,70 %
3,33 %
31,90 %
20
India
19818
24,70 %
19,73 %
55,60 %
21
Afghanistan
19800
1,20 %
18,05 %
80,70 %
22
Bosnia-Herzegovina
19418
8,90 %
21,08 %
70,00 %
23
Netherlands
18903
54,50 %
4,67 %
40,80 %
24
Romania
17414
10,10 %
10,19 %
79,80 %
25
Sri Lanka
16893
9,40 %
36,70 %
53,90 %
26
Kosovo
16752
8,50 %
31,60 %
59,90 %
27
China
16647
37,10 %
11,96 %
50,90 %
28
Iceland
14214
38,80 %
5,78 %
55,50 %
29
South Korea
13286
91,20 %
0,72 %
8,10 %
30
Chile
13259
40,00 %
13,49 %
46,50 %
31
Morocco
13061
23,80 %
31,84 %
44,40 %
32
Ethiopia
12458
16,60 %
20,06 %
63,30 %
33
France
12413
53,00 %
4,21 %
42,80 %
34
Latvia
11936
7,20 %
8,55 %
84,20 %
35
Spain
11595
44,60 %
3,19 %
52,20 %
36
Canada
9430
78,90 %
1,41 %
19,70 %
37
Brazil
8923
47,90 %
2,73 %
49,30 %
38
Colombia
8607
75,90 %
2,18 %
22,00 %
39
Hungary
8485
46,30 %
8,16 %
45,50 %
40
Bulgaria
8242
11,20 %
7,22 %
81,60 %
41
Italy
8099
46,90 %
2,90 %
50,20 %
42
Serbia
7610
16,00 %
13,60 %
70,50 %
43
Ukraine
6750
19,00 %
8,73 %
72,30 %
45
Croatia
6216
20,90 %
12,76 %
66,30 %
44
Estonia
6216
13,50 %
7,00 %
79,50 %
46
Switzerland
5601
72,30 %
2,89 %
24,80 %
47
Sudan
5150
2,90 %
14,27 %
82,80 %
48
Macedonia
4863
17,00 %
27,66 %
55,40 %
49
Australia
4835
67,00 %
1,14 %
31,90 %
50
Slovakia
4757
8,90 %
9,08 %
82,00 %
51
Austria
4690
70,20 %
2,37 %
27,40 %
52
Portugal
4594
24,40 %
5,70 %
69,90 %
53
Palestine
4505
8,10 %
17,31 %
74,60 %
54
Greece
4337
37,70 %
2,70 %
59,60 %
55
Czech Republic
4280
41,50 %
7,06 %
51,40 %
56
Lebanon
4047
21,20 %
24,04 %
54,80 %
57
Myanmar
4022
2,10 %
18,70 %
79,20 %
58
Belgium
3920
66,80 %
2,70 %
30,50 %
59
South Africa
3796
72,10 %
1,90 %
26,10 %
60
Kenya
3664
42,80 %
8,32 %
48,90 %
61
Faroe Islands
3617
78,10 %
2,60 %
19,40 %
62
Congo
3494
15,60 %
19,92 %
64,50 %
63
Ghana
3369
19,80 %
23,21 %
57,00 %
64
Nigeria
3198
26,60 %
16,95 %
56,50 %
65
Japan
3001
65,50 %
2,40 %
32,10 %
66
Indonesia
2895
47,00 %
9,19 %
43,80 %
67
Peru
2801
48,30 %
5,11 %
46,60 %
68
Algeria
2674
34,10 %
19,56 %
46,40 %
69
Argentina
2665
61,50 %
3,60 %
34,90 %
70
Gambia
2636
33,20 %
21,24 %
45,60 %
71
Ireland
2562
57,90 %
2,03 %
40,10 %
72
Mexico
2442
47,50 %
3,73 %
48,80 %
73
Tunisia
2391
40,20 %
17,15 %
42,70 %
74
Egypt
2195
39,00 %
9,57 %
51,40 %
75
Nepal
2123
11,70 %
8,01 %
80,30 %
76
Uganda
2047
27,40 %
12,65 %
59,90 %
77
Albania
1995
13,00 %
12,88 %
74,10 %
78
Madagascar
1980
87,80 %
1,97 %
10,20 %
79
Hong Kong
1927
45,40 %
12,40 %
42,20 %
80
Israel
1861
59,10 %
4,78 %
36,10 %
81
Bangladesh
1750
27,40 %
18,57 %
54,10 %
82
Cuba
1745
37,00 %
5,44 %
57,50 %
83
Tanzania
1663
45,60 %
8,96 %
45,40 %
84
Venezuela
1577
28,60 %
6,28 %
65,10 %
85
Belarus
1549
21,50 %
10,91 %
67,60 %
86
Burundi
1542
6,20 %
24,06 %
69,70 %
87
New Zealand
1490
66,20 %
1,07 %
32,70 %
88
Liberia
1452
17,40 %
21,14 %
61,50 %
89
Dominican Republic
1433
29,50 %
12,00 %
58,50 %
90
Malaysia
1424
40,50 %
6,74 %
52,70 %
91
Ecuador
1418
59,80 %
4,37 %
35,80 %
92
Cameroon
1390
46,30 %
10,65 %
43,10 %
93
Singapore
1294
66,20 %
3,09 %
30,70 %
94
Kazakhstan
1240
14,20 %
12,34 %
73,50 %
95
Moldova
1239
10,10 %
10,25 %
79,70 %
96
Trinidad and Tobago
1112
76,30 %
1,08 %
22,70 %
97
Cape Verde
1080
51,50 %
12,50 %
36,00 %
98
Saudi Arabia
1039
9,00 %
15,98 %
75,10 %
99
Bolivia
944
63,50 %
4,24 %
32,30 %
100
Sierra Leone
929
26,90 %
18,84 %
54,30 %
101
Rwanda
902
9,10 %
21,73 %
69,20 %
102
Libya
898
11,80 %
15,26 %
72,90 %
103
Jordan
862
16,80 %
25,99 %
57,20 %
104
Zambia
841
43,30 %
4,76 %
52,00 %
105
Guatemala
816
74,00 %
2,57 %
23,40 %
106
Angola
789
28,50 %
9,38 %
62,10 %
107
Uzbekistan
750
9,30 %
11,60 %
79,10 %
108
Azerbaijan
722
10,70 %
16,62 %
72,70 %
109
Cambodia
717
18,80 %
22,73 %
58,40 %
110
Montenegro
684
12,00 %
23,25 %
64,80 %
111
United Arab Emirates
676
26,30 %
17,46 %
56,20 %
112
Taiwan
658
53,20 %
5,17 %
41,60 %
113
Kuwait
653
15,20 %
23,12 %
61,70 %
114
Slovenia
652
29,00 %
8,59 %
62,40 %
115
Yemen
622
2,10 %
20,26 %
77,70 %
116
Greenland
595
63,90 %
2,52 %
33,60 %
117
Côte d'Ivore
586
37,70 %
10,41 %
51,90 %
118
Costa Rica
560
73,20 %
1,43 %
25,40 %
119
Zimbabwe
531
48,40 %
6,78 %
44,80 %
120
Uruguay
507
54,20 %
4,73 %
41,00 %
121
Senegal
502
28,90 %
16,33 %
54,80 %
122
Mauritius
499
53,70 %
9,62 %
36,70 %
123
Cyprus
464
60,80 %
1,08 %
38,20 %
124
Guinea
428
12,40 %
21,50 %
66,10 %
125
Bhutan
423
4,30 %
9,46 %
86,30 %
126
Georgia
420
12,60 %
10,95 %
76,40 %
127
Armenia
418
11,00 %
13,40 %
75,60 %
128
Jamaica
386
56,50 %
4,66 %
38,90 %
129
Congo-Brazzaville
380
20,30 %
15,79 %
64,00 %
130
El Salvador
371
30,20 %
14,02 %
55,80 %
131
Nicaragua
366
50,00 %
3,55 %
46,50 %
132
Mozambique
337
45,70 %
4,75 %
49,60 %
133
Paraguay
310
60,70 %
2,90 %
36,50 %
134
Kyrgyzstan
302
15,90 %
11,59 %
72,50 %
135
Guyana
275
68,00 %
2,18 %
29,80 %
136
Honduras
274
52,90 %
8,03 %
39,10 %
137
South Sudan
272
9,20 %
27,57 %
63,20 %

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